Thailand: Golden Triangle Asian Elephant Foundation - Part II

Thailand: Golden Triangle Asian Elephant Foundation - Part II

When we first arrived at the Anantara 5 star hotel sweaty, dirty and exhausted from the travel and previous nights farewell party from Pai it's fair to say we felt a little out of place in this incredibly idyllic,serene, sweet smelling and clean hotel lobby.

To volunteer at GTAEF it is a basic requirement to be industry trained whether that be vet, zoo keeper or animal studies student.

Our volunteering work here has been pretty incredible and we have had the opportunity to meet some interesting people whilst we were here. Mornings begin the way every morning in life should begin...free reign over the hotel buffet breakfast!!! It's smoothies, fruits and banana bread were definitely a favourite of mine. We had one other volunteer with us, a beautiful little Rhode Island native Meg. Meg is teaching English in Thailand as part of a program called Fullbrite in a remote village and is here for the year.

Everyday is so vastly different here, as volunteers we are assisting in taking guests on elephant experiences whether it be Mahout training or walking with giants and generally a lot of ele Q & A and providing information on the foundation, how it works and what we do here. The genuine shock we received from a lot of guests just telling them we are volunteers was always fun, we met the guests and would take them down to the elephant camp and by the end our time here we were doing talks and presentations as well as giving the training on how exactly to train as a mahout and interact with the elephants.

Intro to Mahout:

To get up onto your elephant the command is 'Songsoum' which asks the elephant to lift their leg so you can climb up to the neck, then ask them to go you say 'Bai' and tap both ears with your feet. To turn, tap the opposite ear to the direction you want to go and say 'Ben'. To stop squeeze your knees together be say 'how'. There are two ways to hop down off an elephant, these are either to slide of the head in which case you put your feet over the forhead, tap and say 'Tak long' and the elephant will kneel down and you can slide off or jump back on from here. Instead to ask it to sit down tap on it's back and say 'Map long' and it will sit down for you. Predominantly as a mahout a female elephant is preferred as they generally have a much calmer nature and do not experience 'Musthe' which for bull elephants makes them unpredictable, hormonal and generally quite difficult and potentially dangerous which is somewhat reminiscent of a woman's 'time of the month' though Musthe can last for months not days so consider yourselves lucky fellas you only have to put up with our mood swings for a week at most!

 

A lot of the guests we met were loved up honeymooners that had us squirming with "awwwwww" way too often but it was always lovely. Some guests we met were just adventurous spirits enjoying their retirement and trying new things which was always fun. We heard some incredible travel stories from around the globe from Africa to yachting on a private vessel across the seas to exotic locations. Everyone we met was lovely and open and honest, each guest had a genuine interest in the foundation and what we were trying to achieve. It was really refreshing to have open and honest conversations with complete strangers who as I said in my previous blog understand there are two sides to elephant tourism, each with pros and cons.

One particular couple I will never forget. Ron and Joyce stayed for 6 days and we saw them nearly everyday, sometimes twice a day and they were without a doubt two of the coolest people I've ever met, from their incredible minds and intelligence to their downright amazing fashion sense! I will share the link below to the amazing blog post Joyce wrote and shared after they departed.

Joyce's Blog Post - https://m.facebook.com/notes/joyce-voeller-pepos/gentle-giants-of-chiang-rai-thailand/1202112243134005/

When you've been used to having rice and 'something' for a few days or weeks or months in Meg's case you find certain cravings start to appear...pretty much everything in Thailand contains sugar so when that sugar requirement isn't quite fulfilled, you've hit a wall or the high has worn off the cravings are SEVERE! We went to 7-eleven every other day and basically as an equivalent we could have bought a 1kg bag of sugar and called it a day. Snickers!!!! And general chocolate many different kinds of chips, Coke, juice, roll ups, cookies, noodles, cheese Ritz, Oreos, Ferrero Rocher and a whole other assortment of unidentified Thai treats. The other staple was fruit, a little lady in town was always part of our trip there and she had a little cart and we would buy green mangos and pineapple, because we visited so often she always threw in some extra papaya or watermelon which lasted us about two seconds before we had scoffed it down. Our other vice was definitely pizza.....Mekong Pizza to be precise. Without fail my mouth is watering just thinking about it....

CHEESE CHEESE AND MORE CHEESE!!!! We also had one incredible night of Italian food at the restaurant in Anantara where for the first time in a long time we tasted delicious wines, ravioli, lasagne, fresh breads, of course more pizza and desserts. I don't think I've ever been more elated throughout a meal or slept better than I did that night... Amazing!

 

Each of the elephants at GTAEF has a story some from street begging, some from circus or animal entertainment for tourists and others from illegal logging camps. Understanding where these animals come from and what they have been through to see how calm and accepting they have become after years of torment, stress and overworking reinforces in my mind that there is another way to have this industry exist in a world where the current likelihood of an end being put to elephant tourism as a whole does not look to be happening for many years. Though the attitudes of holiday makers are changing and many are making more informed decisions whilst they travel which is certainly a step in the right direction, a total boycott of all ele related activities means no money and no money means the elephants end up virtually jobless and have to find alternate incomes once again.

 

Ban Ta Klang is a village in Thailand famous for having elephants in backyards, this is the place out of work elephants end up. An industry dominated primarily by female elephants means there are many bulls young and old who have nowhere to go, so they end up here. And not just bulls but females, calves, elephants injured or too old to work end up here as well. The elephants here are supported by the government and other organisations to literally keep elephants off the streets though that doesn't mean its the best scenario for them. Often socially isolated or short chained for extended periods as they do not have work or are not able and may well never be required to work.

I can only imagine if I went there I'd walk away with a very heavy heart though is this the lesser of two evils? If the elephants cannot or will not be returned to the wild and are unable to be surrendered to a sanctuary they have one of two viable options; To live in Ban Ta Klang and be fed, watered and the mahouts/elephants needs paid by the government to keep them off the streets this then allowing the mahout to essentially earn money for nothing and thereby not be required to socialise or bond with their elephant or have far less interaction than the animal was previously used to which can cause the relationship built to potentially crumble though this is dependant on the mahout and their family. Or do the elephantsgo to a trekking camp (if a more ethical camp is not possible for both mahout and family) for 12 hours a day though have an opportunity to socialise, exercise and be with their kind even if it isn't the best of circumstances and not only this but the mahout/elephant relationship would remain stronger and allow for a better mental health of the elephant strange as that sounds though this is just my thought process.

Elephants are incredibly intelligent animals that have a self awareness similar to humans, when we look at ourselves in a mirror we know it's us...an elephant knows the same so it's difficult to picture multiple elephants being chained in Ban Ta Klang and not have a general purpose or opportunity to move around and meet their social needs.

Volunteering with Golden Triangle Asian Elephant Foundation has opened my eyes to the possibilities in this industry and the realities of it's current situation. I will absolutely need to further my own research though everything I have found and seen so far has led me to believe that if more is done to create a better life for both elephants and mahouts the future can be brighter and hopefully more places catch on to this type of cooperation between meeting the needs and wellbeing of both human animal and this can only be achieved through organisations such as this one. That being said this is the first place where I have seen or heard of this type of cooperation and I can only hope the word spreads as it IS a positive contribution.

To end on a beautiful positive on our final day here we witnessed what that social bond between elephants truly looks and sounds like.

Ewong and Beau had been apart for two days as Ewong's mahout had been ill. As we were readying ourselves to leave we heard Beau with her ears flared out and her tail up in the air vocalising, she was rumbling, trumpeting, squeaking and trunk popping as loud as she could! Then in the distance an equal distant vocalisation returned her calls...it was Ewong, as she came into camp this 57 year old elephant starts 'running' making a thumping beeline towards Beau. What followed was an incredible elephant catch up with a lot of vocalising and affection using their trunks, checking each other literally from trunk to tail. A beautiful moment that showed just how intelligent and sentient these animals are, something I will never forget and feel honoured to have even had the opportunity to see with my own eyes.

16.3.16

Ewong & Beau reunite

Ewong & Beau reunite

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Yin Lok and Kamkun

Yin Lok and Kamkun

Meg! & Thong Ma

Meg! & Thong Ma

Yin Lok - 4 year old female

Yin Lok - 4 year old female

Boon Lot and her Mahout Pong

Boon Lot and her Mahout Pong

Pun Lap's hairy POV

Pun Lap's hairy POV

Grasslands

Grasslands

That night we had Italian... Oh my....food baby

That night we had Italian... Oh my....food baby

In all our double denim glory

In all our double denim glory

Thailand: Golden Triangle Asian Elephant Foundation Part I

Thailand: Golden Triangle Asian Elephant Foundation Part I

Today is National Thai Elephant Day as has been since 1998.

I have always written from the heart and today will be no different.

The foundation was begun in 2005 with the overall goal of providing a better life for BOTH mahouts and their elephants. Since the end of the logging industry in 1989, 1000s of mahouts and their elephants were put out of work having to find an alternate income for the only skill they knew. This opened the door to elephants begging on the streets of Thailand, pounding the hot concrete for hours or days in search of tourists who would buy a pineapple or bananas from the mahout to feed back to the elephant or pay to take pictures. The busy streets are no place for an elephant to spend it's days and despite being an illegal activity now of course there are still elephants (though not as commonly found in high density areas) out there young or old, at night or day, dodging cars, weaving through crowds being fed bananas and pineapples by tourists - not even making a dent in their daily diet requirements being 10% of their body weight depending on their activity level.

If it's not begging the employment alternatives are either go back to illegal logging camps, join trekking camps for tourists or join the performing industry such as a circus and in all aspects working 10 hours or more per day without rest, without veterinary care and more often than not a minimal diet.

 

The mahout tradition is passed from grandfather to father and from father to son, usually alongside an elephant or two which had been trained by all three as part of the family and has provided a secure income for decades. Once logging was banned this all changed and now with 3000 captive elephants in Thailand an alternative is needed. It's somewhat unrealistic to expect a mahout to give up the only thing they know and pick up another career halfway through their lives, to sell or give up their elephant to a rescue centre and to not buy another.

GTAEF is providing an alternative, an opportunity to change their lives and that of their children. In the beginning the foundation bought 3 elephants from mahouts though very quickly learned in the early days that buying an elephant is NOT the answer. One or more of those mahouts would come back years later with another two elephants bought with that money and try and sell them to the foundation again.

Moving on from this the foundation made a connection with Anantara Resort who provided the space and the grasslands to create an elephant camp for their elephants to reside.

GTAEF instead of purchasing elephants offer to lease elephants from their mahouts and provide security for both mahout and elephant in exchange for the elephant staying at GTAEF and providing guest experiences. Should a mahout choose to bring their elephant here they are provided in exchange a home for their families which live onsite at the camp, life insurance, a salary, education at their local school for their children, veterinary care for their elephant as well as all food for their elephant throughout their time here. Mahouts work with their elephants within the resort to provide guest experiences and when I say 'work' we are not talking about heavy labor or hours and hours per day carting people around. Guests may choose 'mahout training' or 'walking with Giants' for example. In mahout training guests learn the basic commands and ride on the neck from the camp through the grasslands to the river and bathe the elephants. The elephants chosen for this activity will do this once or twice per day for an hour at a time and if more guests arrive a different elephant is chosen who has not walked already. Effectively the animals will walk for two hours per day (an hour per experience at separate times) and at 3:30 go back to the grasslands for the night. For 'Walking with Giants' ironically our youngest elephants take part in this and walk with guests through the grasslands to bathe and up the hill where the juiciest browse is. If they are not required at all for the day they stay out on the grasslands and their mahouts will take them for walks and to bathe.

 

Believe me I had my heart in my throat not knowing exactly what volunteering here would be like and whilst it's obvious to most that in a perfect world we would have elephants roaming free and in sanctuaries across Thailand we are nowhere even close to having that be a possibility across the board. Tourism keeps this industry going and though I do not believe I will ever agree entirely with the idea of riding an elephant after spending time here not only with the elephants but with the guests, the mahouts and the team at GTAEF I am understanding that there is room to gradually change this industry to better address the wellbeing of the elephants. To create a better and safer life for the elephants and keep the mahouts in the trade that they know whilst adopting more humane training methods and protecting the general wellbeing of the animals in their daily life. The good news is that whilst there are still thousands of mahouts out there with their elephants it seems that the tradition of passing on the mahout life to their children is very slowly becoming a thing of the past. Being a mahout is no longer a secure future for their children and not only this but it is a HARD life! Many now encourage their children into education and university to find what they would like to do in life. Infrastructure grows, cities expand, space dwindles and there is nowhere to simply keep your elephant unless you are a part of a trekking camp, the illegal logging industry or a circus.

More commonly as many would know is it is the trekking industry that thrives and seems the most appealing to a mahout looking for work, quite simply the more your elephant rides the more money you make. Welfare in most camps still remains very poor with inadequate diet, short chaining for extended periods and overnight, sun exposure, no access to water, no opportunity for bathing or dusting, long working hours and social isolation. These negative impacts in other camps are what elephants at GTAEF DO NOT experience and no breeding takes place here either under the belief of there being enough captive elephants in Thailand already and there is no need to add to this number.

I am extremely grateful to be able to see both sides of the coin as my heart is ALWAYS with the animals I very rarely put myself in the position of the people. I want to very STRONGLY stress that like anywhere in the world bull hooks are present though it is not necessary to use them as they used to be, like you would use a bridle on a horse or a leash on a dog a bull hook is there for the elephant's safety and that of the humans that work with them and interact with them. Some elephants are more stubborn than others though all are very calm, present in their minds and do not show anxious behaviors or signs of stress. I have witnessed for myself examples of the amount of trust and the positive relationship the mahouts here have with the animals. Asking a 3 tonne animal to move to the left or move to the right or move at all with ONLY a press of the fingertips to the rump and she moves consistently albeit with the exception of finding a delicious snack along the walk. The mahouts here are learning about positive reinforcement and that your animal will cooperate more out of trust and positive memories related to training rather than out of fear which is a new concept given the old traditions.

I have had to separate this post into parts so as to identify the different aspects of my time here and what I have learnt and seen with my own eyes. 

13.3.16

Thong Ma, her Mahout Sanga & his daughter have a beautiful family bond

Thong Ma, her Mahout Sanga & his daughter have a beautiful family bond

Morning 'Mahout experience'  

Morning 'Mahout experience'  

Sunrise over the Grasslands

Sunrise over the Grasslands

Misty mornings at breakfast with zero visibility  out over the grasslands

Misty mornings at breakfast with zero visibility  out over the grasslands

Thong Ma

Thong Ma

Phuki is the only bull at GTAEF however no breeding takes place here.

Phuki is the only bull at GTAEF however no breeding takes place here.

Ele Camp

Ele Camp

Thailand: Life of Pai

Thailand: Life of Pai

Ok ok how could I not use that as a title....C'MON!

Peta and I were in Chiang Mai for less than 48 hours before we decided if we spent an longer we'd be fat and nothing would fit in our bags. BUT let me say, the lady boy show was amazing!!! If you ever go it's a must! It's on every night at 9:30 and those girls and boys can seriously shake it! If you're a guy whether you sit in the front or back you won't be safe so just enjoy the attention. I think these ladies are making some serious coin too, a lot of them had work done, you could see the hormones toning and softening up the muscles (we were literally in the front row) and a lot of them had braces.

UTTERLY FABULOUS performances!!!

Also we visited the 3D Art in Paradise museum where everything makes you look like you're in the picture and was a stupid amount of fun! It got rather awkward though at one picture I posed Peta took the photos then a Chinese tourist stopped and started taking pictures of me posing (like a LOT of pictures) which was MORE than a little weird so I laughed and joked but he didn't go away then Peta being the wonderful friend that she is decided the capture the moment for me as a fond memory. Love that girl!

In Pai we actually ran into the guy who'd been plucked out of the crowd in the Cabaret show in Chiang Mai for some 'audience participation' to Rhianna's 'S+M' by their 'Rhianna' & who we thought might have been 'Britney'. We saw him outside the show when it was over giving out a few kisses to the performers and distinctly remember him expressing "I feel a bit gay tonight!" Which we of course reminded him of when we saw him and it was swiftly followed by a face palm on his part.

Pai is 762 exaggerated bends North of Chiang Mai or 3 hours by mini bus and is the place to be if you are spiritually connected with the earth and all of it's elements.

Dread locks, bare feet, facial tattoos, yoga mats, eccentric outfits, too cool for the world facial expressions and weed make up pretty much the general western population of this amazing little town, just like last time I LOVE PAI! We ended up here for 5 days and met some pretty awesome humans. Peta and I spent our first couple of days mastering the art of doing nothing and we have to say we excelled at this. We sat in 'WhyNot?' bar for almost 5 hours after eating and just read a book and people watched and dammit it felt soooo good. Watching 'farang' hiring scooters across the road and waiting for the odd one who lets out a squeal as they take off never having ridden one and the guy from the shop chasing down them down the road...always a waiting game to see if they were walking or riding when they came back.

We ended up spending one extra day doing nothing after hitting the night food market which had some serious deliciousness going on and then going out that night and having one 'bucket' which contained 4 straws which clearly wasn't meant to be for just 2 people, I believe it contained the equivalent of 8 shots or more. Then following that up with two extra cocktails each which neither of us were prepared for. We sat with a group of Israeli backpackers because we got sick of staring at each other and had a great night of chatter and a very wobbly walk back to our hotel. We believe the culprit of Peta's unhappy tummy was some food market chicken on a stick combined with some seriously strong cocktails (lesson learned).

After our additional day of nothing we realised that we actually needed to go be tourists like all the other 'farang' so we decided to pick up a scooter and drive up to Lod Cave which is about an hour out of Pai. Peta being the experienced rider and me not wanting my father to throttle me when I get home I opted not to drive and chose to be passenger. We stopped on top of the hill at around the halfway mark with a beautiful view either side that looks out over the valleys either side of Pai. On our way out we rode past 3 guys heading in the same direction as us and low and behold they were headed to the cave as well.

The ladies at the entrance grouped us together because we arrived at the same time and it was actually really quiet at the caves at that time which was very lucky as we'd heard later it had gotten incredibly busy with long lines and traffic. Sometimes it pays to do these things yourself instead of on a tour!

 

The cave itself is 1.5km long with a height of approximately 50 meters from floor to ceiling, the Lang river flows through the cave so it's sections are accessible by raft high are built and maintained by the local Shan villagers. It costs 400 baht for a return trip on the rafts plus 150 baht per guide (one guide for 3 people). We went through the 3 accessible sections of the cave. You can also purchase fish food for 20 baht to feed to HUGE fish throughout the river on your way. We rafted through the darkness to the first section lit by lantern, it's incredibly beautiful and peaceful inside but the lantern definitely brings the heat. We explored the caves climbing up steep little ladders and crossing bridges and the guides pointed out the stalactites and stalagmites in their unique formations which resembled things like; curtains, crocodiles, tiger patterns, turtles and my personal favorite was pointed out as "titti" and as if we'd heard it wrong peered around the corner to indeed see a stalactite in the formation of...well an upside down breast. They also pointed out a cave drawing from a hunter approximately 3-4000 years old which had been worn from people touching it over time. The lovely little ladies had a great sense of humor but I think one of them was likely in her 70s shuffling around carrying the lantern which was throwing out some serious heat! All the money made at the caves goes back to the villages that maintain all the rafts and ladders used throughout the caves. As we move from one section to the next by raft it gets darker and we begin to hear bats screeching and flying above. If you ever head to Pai this cave is a must! There are others around however this one is the easiest to access. Coming to the last cave where it peered out to a huge opening where the river continues on it's covered in guano and the smell is pretty strong though inside the last section there are coffins 1000s of years old which I believe were found exactly where you walk through and see them however I'm not 100% on that.

When we left the cave the boys headed back to Pai and Peta and I stayed back and had some food before cruising back down the winding roads into town. Because we only had limited time we ended up going to Pai Canyon for sunset which was stunning, so many scooters were parked out the front and the walk to find a god spot can be a little precarious, steep ledges with sheer drops and tiny walkways most of which if we were in Australia wouldn't be accessible for fear of accidental death.

We ended up meeting back up with Kolton, Max and Caleb in town later at 'The Yellow Sun' and received a really kind compliment from one of the bar staff who I think recognized us and I don't know what we looked like when we were there the day before but he came and said "wow welcome you girls look so clean!".

Saturday we were supposed to head back to Chiang Mai and onto the Golden Triangle so we had a mad scramble morning running around like crazy checking out of the hotel, dropped off the scooter and jumped in the line to buy our bus ticket back for the afternoon. I think it took us about 2 minutes of standing there to decide we didn't want to leave yet and went and had breakfast to talk it out. We worked out we could get a mini bus back to Chiang Mai the next morning then have enough time to make the connecting bus to get us to The Golden Triangle by 5pm which is where we were meeting our next volunteer coordinator for GTAEF. DONE DEAL!

This was swiftly followed by some insane back and forth to book the tickets from different places, booking another hotel, moving our bags from our previous hotel and getting in touch with the guys to coordinate our little 'farang gang' into action for the day.

Finally we headed back out to Pai Canyon again to put in a little bit more effort than we had just sitting and watching the sun. There was a little confusion for Peta as we trekked into the scrub and started following a dried river bed which PETA thought led to the waterfall. The waterfall she thought she was walking to was a completely different place 5kms away and in no way connected with Pai canyon so we bush bashed it back up the worn path and in our sweatiest of states snapped a group pic to mark our success at not dying in the midday heat. Yep from 12 til 2pm may not have been the best time to go for a hectic bushwalk with no clue which way was up but we made it!

Obviously we were DYING for a swim and desperate to find a waterfall so we headed out to the closest one which didn't have high hopes for being the dry season. A little ways down the road there and we were stopped by the police for them to do a thorough and I do mean THOROUGH inspection of the scooters and the boys to ensure we weren't carrying anything naughty. Peta and I just smiled softly and innocently whilst the guys were man handled in depth. 

We made it to the waterfall which was basically uninhabited when we arrived...nailed the timing once again! The waterfall itself was still flowing but pretty smal though the FREEZING water at the bottom was amazing once you could find the guts to jump in, refreshing is an understatement! It took me a while to take the plunge and some serious convincing for Peta to get in BUT with a little 'push' from a complete stranger she was in. If it were one o us especially me I would have paid for that later I'm sure. When we left the waterfall a small army of tourists showed up so we headed out to a Piranha fishing place the boys had been talking about all day just to find it had closed early which was a bummer. We saw some pictures of the size of the Piranha they caught there and they were ENOURMOUS! Here we were picturing little Amazonian critters and it was like they had been pumped full of steroids!!! Though on the upside they had a super cute PUPPY! Which for Peta and I made it well worth the trip there, we all headed back to town to hit up the night food market and a beer which hit the spot. Caleb and Peta had gone to another restaurant and had their own little adventure finding another adorable puppy and found themselves amongst a huge crowd of locals watching someone from the national park catch a giant cobra that had been living at one of the restaurants in a pipeline. They were worried it might be laying eggs there so it had to go! Peta said it definitely wasn't pleasant to watch them pull the reptile from the ground but it was as quick as it could be, placed in a bag and driven out of town to what fate we don't know.

Our final night in Pai we all met up at Sunset Bar just outside of town and chilled there until we couldn't stay awake anymore, with great sadness we farewelled our Pai posse and headed to bed. It was a rough day the next day traveling out to the Golden Triangle on the buses but it was 100% worth it we had an amazing time and wouldn't change a thing! Pai we love you and we will be back again one day. Next stop Golden Triangle Asian Elephant Foundation volunteering for two weeks.

1-6.3.16

 

Photo Credits to #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

Cabaret audience participation XD

Cabaret audience participation XD

Awkward tourist moments at the 3D art museum how we adore them!

Awkward tourist moments at the 3D art museum how we adore them!

View from the top! 

View from the top! 

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 Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

 Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

The Cheetah Girls - Kolton & Max Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

The Cheetah Girls - Kolton & Max

Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

On the way back to Pai  Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

On the way back to Pai

 Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

 Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

 Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

 Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

 Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

 Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

 Photo Credit #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

Pai Canyon Sunset

Pai Canyon Sunset

Pai Canyon pathways

Pai Canyon pathways

The river bed trek to the 'waterfall' i.e. nowhere

The river bed trek to the 'waterfall' i.e. nowhere

Embrace the sweat! 

Embrace the sweat! 

Where we finally reached the marked path again!

Where we finally reached the marked path again!

Photo credit - #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

Photo credit - #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

Photo credit - #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

Photo credit - #RICJAZWORLDTOUR

Farang Gang Pai

Farang Gang Pai